Flower of the Month


April 2017


Moorea Tropical Shadows

This is not new, and it's been in the ground here for over 4 years. I put a few up for sale when I added my own selections to my website under new Nestlebrae hibiscus for sale. They sold almost immediately. Here's a nice shot of a flower after rain. It's in its second day, and the colours from the dramatic first opening have faded, as they do. Still a very nice garden subject.


March 2017

Nothing much notable appeared for the first time in the past couple of months. But March has been better. This new one is called 'Orange Jessica', borrowed from the names of each parent. Vibrant orange, and with a nice centre too.


January-February 2017

This had several flowers in February that attracted my attention. Actually it first flowered several years back, and then fell back into neglect. It's a cross by Syd (Sonny) Stallings in the USA. He used 'Blackberry Jam' and 'Blueberry' as the parents. So this is 'Berry Good Sonny!' Several times my camera has registered very dark tonings, as in one photo. This was in low light conditions both times, at the end of the day (no flash). Normally it is more observed in the lighter tonings. Either way, it has a strong presence.

December 2016

This one has been around at my place since it first flowered several years ago. It is still under cover, so I don't know about outside performance. But I want to keep it somewhere for sure! The pictures were taken under very different lighting conditions. The one not on the old pullover is truer to normal viewing. My name for it is derived from the parental background, and the wonderful sight it can be. It's 'Pastel Swing Time'. And now (as I write this sentence it's 21 March 2017) it goes into the ground outdoors for more testing and observation. Oh, and continued enjoyment too, I hope.


Click the small images below to enlarge



If you click them, they'll come up like this-





October-November 2016

There haven't been good new flowers for months now...OK, they were winter months, but something should have been happening. So I've chosen this one which began to flower before winter 2015. Now I've got the parentage properly identified I've decided to call it 'Tahitian Silver Storm'. It combines the genes of 'Moorea Silver Storm' with one bred in the main population of the Tahitian group. If the flower stabilizes into good form I'll be happy both with that fact (it can be hard to check on a flower's strength and presentation as a garden object from just a few flowers under cover), and with the lovely bi-colour patterns.


August-September 2016  

This flowered for the first time in early 2016. In this warm period it indicated it would be a medium sized flower, at the lower end of the medium range. There were two distinct colours in it, and after juggling some ideas, I settled on 'Orange & Ginger Jam'. 


July 2016

Two flowers this month, in fact. Fairly new for me. The deep red is hard to photograph accurately, but this does give a sense of the depth and strength of colour in it. The rainbow is one of the flowers I have of this sort. Though they are somewhat similar, they all have their charm, and their happy summer connotations for me. Both unnamed as I write this.


June 2016

I hadn't seen one before like this smallish, but very colourful, and ornate, flower. Not in these colours, anyway. It seems like it will be a robust flower, but only time, and further testing, will tell. It's a very new flower, but has gone straight into the 'Flower of the Month' category with looks like this. I've also delved back into the list of possible names from the grandchildren mentioned in the May 2016 entry. Thanks to Alex this is now called 'The Heat of the Day'.


May 2016

After a long gap, and not too many good new flowers in the interim, I've come back to trying to put a Flower of the Month on here again. This was new back in April-May 2016 (last month, as I write this). I asked two of my grandchildren for suggestions. Well, I asked the older one, but both replied, and there were multiple good suggestions. However, here's the name I'm choosing, slightly altered from the original. I hadn't seen one before like this small-medium flower with its delicate, but definite, orange edging.  It's called 'Yes, Alexandra!'.


April 2016

Autumn Blues?  Early this year a New Zealand Hibiscus group was formed on Facebook. I joined when somebody pointed its existence out to me. Russell Fransham subsequently provided a prime picture on the group of the commercially available cultivar 'Blue Thunder'. By chance, I'd taken photos in this month of two of my outdoor "blues". [actually it's really a spectrum of brown-blue-purple-grey colours that typically emerge from breeding efforts aimed this way.] Here are my examples for contrast.

 

September-October 2015

This had a new flower in October 2015, but the plant itself flowered first several years before. Neglected no more, it will be put into a larger bag, with fresh potting mix, pronto!  I've called it Moorea Blue Queen now, and it's to be observed further so that its growth habits can be determined. And by the way, that citrus fruit is a good sized Ugli, and not a little Mandarin, as you might be expecting.


August 2015

This is 'Chamomile Tea', named mostly by me for its colours, but also because the parents are called 'Iguana' and 'Green Tea'. Within the mild brown/orange face are complex colours that also reach towards pink and brown-greens. Subtle. But then, it is chamomile tea, and not strong coffee!


July 2015

Good colours and style makes this one worth observing further. It was bred from parents one of which included 'M. Violet Moon' as part of its lineage. So, I'm calling this 'Trace of a Violet Moon'


June 2015

Recently I put together a collection of flowers available on some of my plants, and presented them to Valerie Hunton, a Kerikeri painter. Here are some of those flowers, and the time was late May 2015. All are new ones raised by me from imported seeds.


May 2015

This one first flowered for me some years ago on South Kaipara Head. I planted it soon after I arrived here in October 2011. It blooms reliably once summer heat arrives, and it is building a stronger structure amidst some other plants crowding it. Arguably the best of the new flowers I've had in this colour range. I call it 'Towering Inferno'.


April 2015

One of my real successes is 'Jane Verbitsky'. Here is an excellent cluster of flowers. This sort of flowering becomes more likely as the plants in the ground grow older and stronger. I hope that when it is twice its current age it will be like this all over in a future April, a time when heat-loving hibiscus are thriving. See May 2012 below for an earlier glimpse of this flower.


February 2015

By my standards this is an oldie, and a goodie. It's one of the very brightest of the earliest seedlings that I raised when I first began with hibiscus. I called it 'Volcano's Throat'. As close as I want to get to the real thing, btw. I live in a volcanic field that stretches inland, and also back out to the coast. There are something like 27 volcanic hills and vents in the field, none of them active for over 1,500 years.


January 2015

For a long time I argued with myself about the name for this. It's initial name was going to be something playing on the intense yellow tones in it. Instead, I've named it after an old friend, 'Penelope Carroll'.  I haven't tried it outdoors yet. Provided that it performs well in the sun, rain, and wind, then I'll keep that name. Its namesake loves yachting, including yacht racing, so our real weather doesn't bother her too much.


December 2014

"Very frou frou" commented my former partner, Rosemary. One of the parents, on Moorea, was a flower called 'Tahitian Pink Princess', so I've tentatively called this one, which first flowered before Winter 2014, 'Pink Prince'.  But, yes, in terms of our usual expectations of traditional and plain hibiscus flowers in New Zealand, this is definitely getting into the elaborately decorative.


November 2014

After Francesca (see the entries for the two months below this one) our main instructor was Oni until early 2015. And of course Oni deserved her own flower. I was looking through her website. I noticed a photo of her taken in Alaska. The colours in her photo fitted very well with this new flower, so I promptly named it 'Oni in Alaska'.



October 2014

Francesca became pregnant and continued to lead us through the yoga classes. This flower was named very soon after she gave birth to a delightful little daughter, Aria Grian. And that is the name of this flower: 'Aria Grian'.



September 2014

Early in 2012 I strained my back while lifting something overhead. This really restricted me in terms of establishing my new gardens. It took months before it cleared more or less properly, although it can still twinge if make a bad move while bending down towards the ground. Yoga classes were suggested to me as something to try. I was pleased I tried the experience, though I am strictly an ungainly and once a week practitioner. It really helped me think about mobility, and about how restricted in movement I had become with advancing age. I was happy to name a flower after my first teacher. Here is 'Francesca T'.


July & August 2014

Early in July disaster struck. The third major storm of the year up to that point tore the roof of my plastic house apart, right above all the new plants that I was raising in relative winter warmth. Finding someone to fix it was not easy. It took till late in August to repair the damage. This meant that all the warm climate plants, including the new hibiscus, were suddenly living fully exposed to wintry conditions within a few minutes of the damage beginning. [For a bit more on the saga, see "Nestlebrae Today" after clicking on "About Us" in the bar at the top of any page.] The last thing that you were likely to see during this time was a candidate for 'Flower of the Month'. And that was nearly the last thing I was thinking about!


Please Note: computer problems resulted in the entries beyond this being severely interfered with. In time I hope to rectify this.


It's Wimbledon Week as I write this, and what could be more appropriate (perhaps with some cream added) than a good dish of 'Strawberries and Chocolate'? And here it is! 


without a name, this is much the best of the flowers that I have from new seedlings in this colour range for its form, display, and good medium size. It's being called 'Bruce'. After many attempts, this is the best registration yet of its colour. In real life there are interesting darker tonings in the flowers, but my camera doesn't quite show reality. Even quite good digital  cameras are not perfect with some colours, unfortunately.


May 2014

The two big storms that hit northern New Zealand in early 2014 were remnants of fully destructive cyclones from the South Pacific tropics. They did some real damage on my developing property. I'm thankful that my older son came for a brief visit so he could give his new motorcycle a proper workout, especially on the windy roads of a trip that is 300 kilometers each way. He very handily made some repairs to damaged fastenings holding some of the plastic on my covered growing house. Purely by chance a new flower opened on the morning we were working on it. It seems very apt to call this one 'David Prince'.


April 2014

This one flowered for the first time right at the end of March 2014. The first two people to see it thought it was suitably autumnal in its tonings and misty too, rather than with sharply defined colours. I've named it 'Premonition of Autumn'.


February-March 2014

 As I haven't quite settled on a name yet, July – August 2013

It's Wimbledon Week as I write this, and what could be more appropriate (perhaps with some cream added) than a good dish of 'Strawberries and Chocolate'? And here it is! 



July – August 2013

It's Wimbledon Week as I write this, and what could be more appropriate (perhaps with some cream added) than a good dish of 'Strawberries and Chocolate'? And here it is! 


June 2013

I was puzzled by this flower when it first came out in the north. It was only after some hours, and several observations, that I was excited to realize that it's one I had down south, and it is now blooming again for me. Welcome back! For a sense of how welcome it was when I began to grow new seedlings, click on "new flowers and fruit" in the line near the top of this page and select "new hibiscus - beginnings". It was one of my very first ones, so it has a special place in my hibiscus memories, even if it wouldn't stand out now.


May 2013

Now back flowering again in autumn, I'm hoping this one, in the ground since late 2011, strengthens and flowers more in the future. It's another in my collection bred in Moorea, and its name is 'Moorea Tropical Shadows'.


June 2012<%2ows that it has in its makeup a mild thrust towards becoming a double. Mostly I don't like the latter, but this one is really quite interesting, even cute. It's to be called Eastern Moon Girl, a name derived from its parents.


March 2013

February 2013


 

This one turned up unexpectedly. As it happened, I'd only just discovered the first flower on it, when I got an email from a former colleague at Auckland University who has kept in touch with me. It seemed the right name for the flower had fortuitously arrived! So here's 'Jane Verbitsky'.

November–December 2012

It took a long, long time before flowers began to reappear in Spring, even under plastic. I waited for a particular bud to open, but it never did. November turned into December. So, when two new ones appeared at last, and on the same day too, I decided to use them both as I now had to cover these two months. They're not named yet, so they are just here to enjoy. The yellowish one was bred on Moorea (Tahiti) and the other one comes from a breeder on the eastern seaboard of the USA. Definitely worth assessing them both, and the yellow one really is particularly pretty in real life!

October 2012


There's something I immediately thought about it ... "Wow!" It seemed then to be really promising, and I'm looking forward to see how it comes out of winter and eventually flowers again. Excellent colours, and it's held well on the bush for display ... and so it's easy to understand that this became, "Ness Road". Now I've thought more about it at a later date. It's been finally named 'John Prince' (autumn 2015).


September 2012

August 2012

July 2012


June 2012

"Wedding Hat for a Princess"! A friend with recent Middle East experience had a better idea and suggested "khamseen" (pronounced "harm-seen") after the wind that sweeps into Cairo from the western desert and turns the sky just that colour. It is also apt, because "it's a swirling, eddying kind of wind". (However, by early 2014 experience with it growing outdoors had convinced me that it does not have either good or attractive form. Conclusion: there is no substitute for proper trialling outdoors, which is where nearly all plants are grown in New Zealand/Aotearoa.)


May 2012

This one turned up unexpectedly. As it happened, I'd only just discovered the first flower on it, when I got an email from a former colleague at Auckland University who has kept in touch with me. It seemed the right name for the flower had fortuitously arrived! So here's 'Jane Verbitsky'.


 April 2012

Here's a surprise for the first Flower of the Month. It was only when I looked at the great subtlety of the colours in this (so far) unnamed flower it fully grabbed me. One day I'll look at the names of the parents, and call it something more than 'Innominata01'). A hibiscus by any other name would be...?


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